Korea’s Cinderella Law is About to Become a Pumpkin

shutdown-law-korea

shutdown-law-korea

In spite of the fact that South Korea has one of the most vibrant and talented e-sports communities  in the world, the game community has always had a love-hate relationship with government regulators.

Perhaps the most well-known example of this is in the country’s infamous Cinderella Law , set in place to prevent youth from playing online video games after midnight. Also known as the Shut-down law, its implementation in 2010 was mostly a response to fears over video game addiction.

Since most online games require users to sign-up using their government issued identification number (similar to a social security number), the implementation was rather easy. Anyone born after a set date was booted from online games after midnight, and not allowed to play again until 6 AM. But the efficacy of the law has been called into question since its inception.

The results of a 2013 report, for instance, show that children 9 to 14 are still more likely to play online games than mobile, offline PC, or console games.

It has also been relatively easy to skirt the law by using a parent or older siblings ID to create an account (with or without their consent). Realizing this, the Ministry of Gender Equality and Family has called for law to be reformed, stating that most families have been standing on their own values, rather than the government’s, in deciding whether their children are allowed to play video games.

The proposed revisions would come into effect next year, and would allow children to play online video games after midnight, providing they had their parents permission.

[source: Games in Asia]

 

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Do government regulations on gaming ever work? What is the best way to handle the potential threat of online gaming addiction?