Chuseok Madness: Korea’s biggest holiday hits the tech world

mobile-games-chuseok

mobile-games-chuseok

The summer heat is leaving Seoul and the mountain leaves are turning bright orange and red. It’s the time of year for Korea’s most important holiday: Chuseok.

Similar to American Thanksgiving, Chuseok is the biggest holiday on the Korean calendar. Every year millions of people leave the city of Seoul to visit friends and family in the surrounding provinces for a five day weekend of great food, soju, and traffic. Lots of traffic.

But it’s not only express ways that get overwhelmed with traffic. Every year the country’s biggest telecoms – SK, LG U+, and KT – have to reinforce their networks in preparation for the spike in communication traffic that comes with the holiday.

This year, telecom companies estimate mobile traffic to increase by 500% in some congested areas, like highways, as people make their way to hometowns. An overall 2.7% increase in communication traffic is expected for the entire country.

Korea-Telcom-Companies

As the Korea Joongang daily reports:

“the number of unlimited data service users has increased recently, data usage other than voice calls and text messages is expected to go up significantly. This year’s Chuseok holiday runs from today through Sept. 9, and for some companies includes Sept. 10.

The number of voice calls is expected to increase 5 percent, text messages 32 percent, and the use of wireless data 20 percent. Use of T Map services is expected to jump 166 percent.

SK Telecom will operate a special communications situation room during the six-day holiday. It will also reinforce its spam message monitor system.”

Chuseok in Games

Chuseok is also having a big impact on mobile games. Several companies have created special, in-game events to take advantage of the holiday. A few examples include:

monstertaming_chuseok_event

CJ E&M’s 몬스터기들이기 (Monster Trainer) planned a songpyeong event (Korean rice cake desert).

tinyfarm-chuseok-event

Com2Us’ Tiny Farm is hosting a harvest event with rewards given passed off the number of rice plants users can harvest.

mystery-event-chuseok 회색도시’s (Gray City) Chuseok update includes a mystery code event where users can find codes and unlock special gifts.

Spice up your games with a touch of Chuseok

Korean-thanksgiving-chuseok

If you’ve got a game in Korea that you’re looking to spice up with your own events there are plenty of things to consider. Food, for example, is an important part of the festival.

One of the most recognizable Korean snacks around the Chuseok holiday is songpyeon, a sweet rice cake that holds sesame seeds, beans, and other traditional ingredients. They are often green, pink, or yellow. Fruits, like apples, are also a seasonal favorite around the Chuseok festival. As much as food, ceremonies are a big part of the tradition as well, some more popular than others.

One of the more common family events is to visit the burial grounds of relatives and pay respect to earlier generations of family. Because of this, public cemeteries are often quite crowded during the holiday season. Others include bull fights,  weaving, traditional performance art, and traditional music.

 

From everyone at Latis Global Communications, we wish you all a Happy Chuseok! Don’t forget to join us on Facebook and Twitter so you can get more updates about the Korean gaming industry!

Korea’s Cinderella Law is About to Become a Pumpkin

shutdown-law-korea

shutdown-law-korea

In spite of the fact that South Korea has one of the most vibrant and talented e-sports communities  in the world, the game community has always had a love-hate relationship with government regulators.

Perhaps the most well-known example of this is in the country’s infamous Cinderella Law , set in place to prevent youth from playing online video games after midnight. Also known as the Shut-down law, its implementation in 2010 was mostly a response to fears over video game addiction.

Since most online games require users to sign-up using their government issued identification number (similar to a social security number), the implementation was rather easy. Anyone born after a set date was booted from online games after midnight, and not allowed to play again until 6 AM. But the efficacy of the law has been called into question since its inception.

The results of a 2013 report, for instance, show that children 9 to 14 are still more likely to play online games than mobile, offline PC, or console games.

It has also been relatively easy to skirt the law by using a parent or older siblings ID to create an account (with or without their consent). Realizing this, the Ministry of Gender Equality and Family has called for law to be reformed, stating that most families have been standing on their own values, rather than the government’s, in deciding whether their children are allowed to play video games.

The proposed revisions would come into effect next year, and would allow children to play online video games after midnight, providing they had their parents permission.

[source: Games in Asia]

 

We want to hear your thoughts!

Do government regulations on gaming ever work? What is the best way to handle the potential threat of online gaming addiction?

Case Study: How to Build Community and Increase User Retention

Fincon-Hello-Hero-Community

Fincon-Hello-Hero-Community

In the Spring of 2014, Fincon, the creators of Hello Hero, came to us with a problem. They had a huge following, but wanted to improve their game community in the United States. Over the course of two months, Latis Global and Fincon teamed up to reinvigorate their state-side community management program with fantastic results.

One of the reasons we started this blog in the first place is to share information with you so that you can make your games more successful, wherever you launch. Today we are happy to share the first of many case studies and e-books with you. All we ask is that you sign-up to our mailing list and we will provide you with a link to our free case study where you can find out how Latis Global and Fincon teamed up and improved user retention rates by nearly 60%.


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What Is KakaoTalk? An introduction to Korea’s biggest game platform

Kakao Talk Messenger

Kakao Talk Messenger

The sounds of Kakao notifications going off may now be the most ubiquitous noise in all of Korea. Installed on nearly every smartphone in the country, it’s fair to say that KakaoTalk has dominated the domestic market, both as an OTT/SNS app, and more recently as a gaming platform.

Now that they have announced a merger with the tech titan, Daum, KakaoTalk may be the most powerful app in the entire country. So why do so few outside of Korea have deeper understanding of it? In this article, we’re going to give you a big picture view of the powerful platform, elaborate on its success, and explain how to register your own game onto Kakao.

To start, let’s talk about where the app began.

 

The Origins of Kakao

Kakao Corporation was founded in 2006 by Kim Beom-soo, former CEO of NHN Corporation, with the mission of creating web-based SNS services (NHN is the parent company of Naver, the leading Korean search portal, and LINE, the #1 OTT messaging app globally). In 2009, due partly to its lack of services for the web and the blossoming potential of the mobile market, Kakao pivoted from designing web based projects, and devoted themselves to the mobile market.

When KakaoTalk launched in March 2010, its main competitors were Google Talk, Whatsapp and NateOn. KakaoTalk quickly differentiated itself from all 3 apps with its highly polished user experience and aesthetics. Unlike Google Talk, Kakaotalk understood the significance of a smartphone’s contact book over email contacts, automatically porting a user’s phone contacts to create a Kakao friend list.

 

OTT-Apps-Kakao

 

This would not only make for a convenient user experience, but would later form a powerful, smartphone-centric social graph that would serve as the bedrock for Kakao’s later ventures into SNS (through KakaoStory) and gaming (KakaoGame). Google and Facebook, encumbered by their own proprietary social graphs based on desktops, would be late in realizing the importance of the smartphone social graph.

Furthermore, Korea’s long history with freemium mechanics (see: Maple Story) helped KakaoTalk embrace a more forward-looking, micro-transaction based model from launch. This business model would guide its future products, especially in the monetization of stickers and in-app-purchases within games on their platform.

Contrast this with Whatsapp, which was organizationally uncomfortable with micro-transactions. Though the two apps are similar in original concept, their paths would soon diverge due to these philosophical differences.

Within two years, nearly 90 percent of all Korean smartphone users were chatting, or “Ka-talking”, achieving the same branding and cultural importance of services such as Google (“Google It”).

 

Enter the Gaming Market

Kakao worked diligently to expand its product line. Through apps such as KakaoStory, a smartphone-centric replacement to SNS sites like Facebook, KakaoTalk grew dramatically more influential. Photos, groups, videos and other apps were also developed, ultimately leading to KakaoGame, the crown jewel of Kakao.

Before KakaoGame, many companies had to bridge the divide between social networking and gaming. Often, this would involve a company creating a new social graph from its customers, usually based off their email. However, most mobile games had a short shelf-life, severely reducing the incentive for users to sign up for the platform. Those that did were hardcore users, not only in their allegiance to the game, but to its respective company. The end results were communities of hardcore gamers with very little reach to the more desirable casual gamers. Common examples of communities like this include EA’s Origin, Glu, Gamevil, Com2us and Openfeint. Even Apple’s Game Center, despite its ubiquity, initially had trouble integrating social elements to the platform.

kakao-business-explained

KakaoGame made SNS users care about mobile games, and vice versa. The service allowed games to sync with a phone’s contact list, allowing for effective implementation of networking features such as invites and co-op play. Through this platform, the modern Korean mobile gaming market was born. Profits ballooned, as two of the earliest titles, Anipang and Dragon Flight went on to become hugely successful, shooting their popularity to the top of the charts and becoming “national games” after only a month.

The South Korean gaming market increased from $300 million to $1.1 billion in a year thanks to the success of Kakao.

kakao-talk-dragonflight

DragonFlight was one of the first successful games on Kakao, driving millions of downloads across the country.

To put it into perspective further: a year ago, a Korean mobile game was lucky if it hit 1 million game downloads. Games on Kakao have boosted that with 8 games on Kakao generating more than 8 million downloads. The previously mentioned Anipang and Dragon Flight have generated more than 20 million downloads. It’s also worth noting that as of now, eight out of ten of the highest grossing games in Korea are games from Kakao with only Clash of Clans and FIFA being able to slip into the top ten.

 

Can I join too?

While Kakao games were built with smaller publishers and developers in the beginning, larger companies have flocked to the platform since its success. Big names like CJ E&M, WeMade and Com2us have put out numerous popular titles on Kakao.

Western titles, such as Wooga’s Jelly Splash, have also joined the platform, with varying degrees of success. Given that Korea is currently the #3 Google Play market in the world, it’s an opportunity that you can’t afford to miss if you want to be truly global. The best way to achieve this is by building a relationship with an experienced partner in Korea, submitting your game to the Kakao platform is easy enough.

 

How to Submit a Game on Kakao

Even if you can’t speak Korean, the process for submitting your game is very straightforward and easy. Start by going to their website (http://with.kakao.com/game/en/proposal), and filling out the form with the details of your game and some basic information including:

  • Title
  • Genre
  • Whether your game is released yet or not
  • A brief description of your game
  • A place to attach your proposal file (you must explain how your game will integrate with Kakao’s social graph here, as well as how the game will monetize)
  • A download link to your game
  • Your company info

After filling out and submitting the form, Kakao then goes through a process of reviewing your proposal. If it looks interesting to them, they will contact the developer or publisher with the possibility of signing a contract.  It may be necessary to visit Korea personally, or to have a Korean speaker available, to explain some of the more elaborate points of your game. Finally, if Kakao accepts your application, it’s time to move onto SDK integration. But we’ll save that for another time.

 

The Future

WeChat adopted a similar platform for China in 2013 with great fanfare and even greater revenue explosions. LINE has also integrated its popular OTT messenger with its games, most notably in Japan. Even in Korea several alternate platforms are popping up, which will be discussed in future posts.

So, not only are alternate platforms rising up to compete with Kakao, but with so many apps now on the Kakao store, it’s becoming harder for companies to find success even with Kakao’s powerful social graph.

Over the course of the month, we’ll discuss some of these alternate methods for finding success in Korea. But for today, we recognize the juggernaut that is Kakao.

 

Have a question? Contact us!

Please leave a comment if you have any questions, especially if you’re interested in launching in Kakao. We’ll be more than happy to get back to you with all of your questions and concerns. In the meantime, don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and Facebook so we can connect you with more information about making your games a success in Korea.

 

profile picKyle Hovanec is a writer currently living and working in South Korea. He writes for several Korean publications including Latis Global Communications. You can contact him at khovanec87@gmail.com 

Game Spotlight: A Thief is coming to Android and iOS

Thief-Lupin-2

Thief-Lupin-2

The mischievous Thief Lupin is coming back to Android and iOS devices this fall as Bluewind prepares to release the second adventure of the masked jewel fiend. Thief Lupin 2 features all new puzzles, levels, and characters with the familiar gameplay fans have come to love from the series debut, which reached the top 10 free games in 57 countries. In the sequel to their first major hit, Bluewind has refocused their effort and made the game Lupin was always meant to star in.

thief-lupin-2-gameplay

If you’ve played the original Thief Lupin, the basics in the sequel will not be too hard to master. The goal of the game is to achieve a three-star rating in all levels of the map as you fight your way through different worlds facing off against vampires, giant puffer-fish, and hordes of bats. Each level challenges players with time limits, skill-use limits, and other goals that must be achieved to earn stars. Complete more levels to earn points and unlock new characters and items.

theif-lupin-friends

Players familiar with goal oriented free-to-play games like Angry Birds, and Plants vs. Zombies will find this a refreshing return to casual games amid the recent trend of more RPG oriented releases. The one touch mechanics in a simple, 2D platform environment are accessible to all players. As you earn more in-game currency you can unlock skins, boost your health and defensive items, and add more characters to your roster. Among the team of friends joining Lupin in his new adventure are the Pirate Katarina, Frankenstein’s Monster, and the Mummy.

Check out the game play below and check for more Thief Lupin 2 updates by liking the Facebok page.

Send a tweet and spread the word about Thief Lupin 2! Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for news on more great indie games from Korea!

 

Korea’s Mobile Game Industry: 4 Things You Need to Know

kakao_talk

In this modern age of globalization, reaching beyond your own market and expanding into a different one makes sense from many different perspectives. Expanding to larger group of users who are interested in playing your titles is an excellent way to increase revenue and brand awareness across a global market.

While there are many large and successful markets within Asia, its impossible to deny the explosive growth and success of the Korean gaming market. With a total worth of over 9 billion dollars that continues to steadily grow, the gaming market, and specifically the mobile gaming market is one success story after the other, with some of the most popular mobile titles making up to $300,000 daily in revenue.

With a heavy saturation of mobile devices, and a population that embraces and plays titles faster than any other country in Asia, now has never been a better time for foreign developers to make the leap into the Korean market.

What Korea Offers

Korea currently has mobile penetration rate of over 100%. Within that 100% nearly 95% of all users use a messaging platform to communicate with their friends and family. While messaging platforms are beginning to pick up steam in North America and Europe, in Korea popular platforms like Kakao have dominated the scene for over several years, and show no signs of slowing down. With over 70 million users in other countries using Kakao and over 90% penetration rate for Korea, Kakao is a platform to connect with all demographics. Whether young or old, rich or poor, everyone uses Kakao to communicate.

 

mobile-games-korea

If you’re wondering why this matters for games, the answer comes from Kakao’s own distribution service. Along with communication, Kakao also offers users a gateway to download books, coupons and even games through its service. The introduction of games has proven to be a massive success, with a majority of the most popular and highest grossing mobile titles in Korea coming from Kakao. Learning how to publish through Kakao offers a huge advantage when it comes to promotion and distribution with a large network of users who can advertise and share a game with the swipe of a finger.

What About Google Play/iOS?

While western developers are used to prioritizing the iOS market place over Google Play, it’s important to realize that in Korea, the opposite is true. With Android devices making up the majority of hardware sales, Android enjoys over a 90% share of the market. This is largely due to domestic hardware manufacturers like Samsung and LG. As such,  Apple has barely made a foothold in the marketplace and domestic game developers tend to take and Android first approach.

 

top-games-korea

For a developer unfamiliar with the Korean market, it may seem like a daunting task to try and enter the fast paced and demanding market. While there are some barriers to crossing over to this market, understanding the market and having a plan that allows developers to utilize various platforms and market places is the key to success. Messaging platforms are starting to catch on with game distribution, with other similar services to Kakao such as Band, Line, and MyPeople starting to offer games through their services. While Kakao definitely has a strong grip on the messaging and gaming market, success outside of Kakao is not impossible. For example, Clash of Clans, is the number two highest grossing title in Korea as of this writing,  and it is not distributed through Kakao. Success without Kakao is entirely possible, as a well made and popular game will sell regardless of platform. Knowing what Korea likes to play is another big step in confidently breaking into the market.

What Korea Likes to Play

Games in Korea fall into three categories: casual, mid-core, and hard-core. Casual titles being colorful, easy to play titles that all ages and demographics can play. These include games like puzzle games  and endless runners, such as the famous Cookie Run, developed by Devsisters. While these are by far the most popular titles in Korea, they also come from a market that is the most crowded and most competitive and they don’t monetize as well as mid-core and hard-core titles. The genre also suffers from a lot of copy-catting as smaller studios try to get a slice of the pie.

Mid-core games have more advanced game mechanics and require more commitment than casual titles. Examples of this are the hack and slash titles and action RPGs, such as the mobile blockbuster Blade, produced by 4:33 studios.

Hardcore games offer the most complicated and time consuming gameplay, requiring the user to invest the most amount of time and effort in the game. RPG’s and Turn Based RPG’s are most common in the hardcore genre, including titles such as Soul of Legend, a mobile MOBA.

MOBA-Mobile-Korea

Seoul of Legend, a hardcore, MOBA from Korea.

Mid and hard-core offer the most opportunity for western developers. The casual market is saturated and difficult to gain recognition.  Without international momentum to carry into the market, as King had with Candy Crush, developers from abroad are likely to drown in the noise of Korea’s casual market.

Planning for the Future

The best opportunity for western developers lies in the mid and hard-core markets. Not only is it a less saturated  market, but they also tend to monetize better, with users willing to pay more and invest more of their time in their games. While some mid to hard core games have begun to find success, it is no where near the same level of saturation as the casual tiers, this means that the market is ripe for new ideas and new titles.

With a high saturation rate of users, a market that makes millions of dollars daily and a niche that is still waiting to properly explode with popularity; the opportunity for western developers to publish their titles in Korea has never been more advantageous. Researching your demographic, knowing what the audience wants (or what is popular) and most obviously, having a great game are the keys to succeeding in Korea.

Tell Us WhatYou Think

Have a game you’re interested in releasing in Korea? Let us know about it! Leave a comment and a link to your game. Don’t forget to connect with us on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn for more pro-tips on making hit games for Korea.

 

profile picKyle Hovanec is a writer currently living and working in South Korea. He writes for several Korean publications including Latis Global Communications. You can contact him at khovanec87@gmail.com 

Building Community: How to run effective events in Korea

Hello-Hero-Midfielder-David-Event

In game events and promotions are a way for publishers and developers to accomplish two things with their game: to keep their current user base interested and to gain new players to expand the game’s numbers. While it may seem like a straightforward way to gain new players and keep your old ones, there is much more that needs to be done in order to keep your existing audience happy and convince newcomers to download your game. Like nearly every other aspect of selling a successful mobile game in Korea, planning, knowing and respecting your audience are key factors to having in game events and promotions that maintain interest or fall flat on their face.

Selling your event

Along with selling the initial game itself, the right kinds of advertising for in game events requires not only a keen understanding of the game’s audience, but the game itself. It goes without saying that if you’re going to promote for an event for Blade, you’re not going to have cutesy animals dancing all over the screen.  Along with having a promotion that matches the tone of your game, there are also some general things to keep in mind.

Successful advertising for game events and promotions always seem to have these key features:

Humor goes a long way with promoting in Korea. Unlike western audiences, Koreans rarely want a bullet point explanation about each event or item give away. Short, funny promotions using characters from the game or real life celebrities (more on that later) can help grab the attention of Korean gamers.

Promotions also have to be exciting and eye catching almost immediately. Flashy banners with lots of colors and big letter fonts will usually catch the people’s attention. For example, the game Chagu Chagu often features ads with large font, action scenes from the game and an excited announcer. People who play the game are already familiar with how the game works, so focusing on getting to the point quickly makes for more effective advertising than a tepid run down of each promotion or event.

Korea-In-Game-Events

Koreans are crazy for celebrities, and love to see them interacting and using the same things that they do, including playing the same games as them. It’s no secret that attractive and famous people sell products. Often you’ll see games with famous K pop stars and actors playing popular mobile games in an attempt to promote new content. A player beginning to become bored with a title may now have a renewed interest if one of their favorite stars is promoting the game, and showing off new content.

Communication with the player

While a majority of western gamers may find the use of pop ups in games cumbersome and annoying, Korean games tend to be more accepting and receptive towards in game pop ups and pre game screens, reminding of them of the latest event. Using various forms of social media are also effective ways of promoting events and also gaining a look at the amount of interest people are showing as well. Using the example of Chagu Chagu again, the game sends messages and updates to a user’s phone to remind them of events and the amount of time they have to participate.

Plus-Friend-Event-Kakao

Message apps like Kakao also have the ability to add Plus Friends related to games that integrate with your friend’s list and send messages about each game event. Through the seamless merging of games with social platforms, publishers have the power to promote and advertise for their game’s events in a way that a majority of Korean gamers find both useful and un-intrusive in their daily lives.

Worth the time

While savvy marketing and smart integration are important to running successful events, the most fundamental factor in separating successful events from failures comes down to one question: Is it worth the time?

Korean gamers care about the games they invest time into. They care about their time and effort spent playing games and are always looking to feel like their hard work and playtime are rewarded. All mobile games, eventually fall to the point of being too repetitive and simplistic to gamers, who then begin to look elsewhere for a new, exciting experience. The most successful mobile games know this and are always trying to offer new events with different kinds of prizes ranging from in game items that are either rare or exclusive, to real life prizes such as cash and Macbooks to keep people interested.

Events that show up around specific days such as holiday or nation-wide events have shown to be successful. Popular games such as FIFA Online 3 ran a variety of World Cup themed events that proved to be very popular among users. Golf game Golf Star has events that happen during the different seasons and offer different items, avatars and discounts for the summer period.

Cookie-Run-Kakao-Event

For more in depth titles such as MMORPGs, having events is important to convincing players to keep playing. One example is Sunkuk: Rule the World, an MMO that has in game events as a main feature, featuring new events with new items and prizes available everyday rewarding players simply for logging in and participating.

It’s important to note that while in game events may differ across different genres and different publishers, the successful games all share the same thing when it comes to events. Events must quickly catch the attention of the player, offer strong incentives to participate and feature events and timing that coincide with the real world. Gamers are much more likely to remember to participate in events related to real life things rather than try and remember specific time periods.

In game events if created with the user in mind, can provide a way to boost interest in a game and allow a game to continue to be successful by offering players new reasons and most importantly, new interest in a game, potentially allowing a game to thrive in an always competitive and always changing mobile market.

 

profile picKyle Hovanec is a writer currently living and working in South Korea. He writes for several Korean publications including Latis Global Communications. You can contact him at khovanec87@gmail.com 

Kakao Talk Odds & Ends: Kakao Games Celebrates 2 Year Anniversary

kakao-talk-anniversary

The team at Latis Global is glad to send Kakao Games a big congratulations on their 2nd anniversary. For the past two years, the mobile gaming platform has gone from a small up-and-comer with just a few games, to one of North East Asia’s most important distribution platforms boasting hundreds of AAA and indie titles. To celebrate, we’ve created an infographic to show just how far they’ve come in such a short time.

kakao-games-birthday

 

As always remember to follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook, for more great articles about games in Korea.

 

 

Mobile Game Trends: Why is BAND Games failing to compete with Kakao?

Band-Games-LOH

There’s no denying that the Korean mobile game market is a market big enough to share. Since the success of Kakao and their own distribution system, other media outlets and competitors have been scrambling to cash in on Kakao’s success, hoping that their own unique spin to the social networking and gaming distribution scene.

BAND from Naver is one of the latest services to attempt to join the increasingly crowded market. BAND strives to deliver service that allows you to create different groups for different kinds of people you want to communicate with. Similar to Google Plus, BAND allows users to curate their followers, giving the user full control over what information is shared their friends. Along with their social media feature, BAND also features a marketplace to distribute chat stickers, coupons and games. While this seems like it could possibly be a interesting and unique alternative to Kakao, in terms of game distribution, BAND unfortunately features several flaws that hold it back and ultimately, keeps it squarely in the second tier spot compared to other services such as Kakao and HIVE.

A New Way to Communicate

On the surface, BAND appears to be on the right path for game distribution. Launching May 12, 2014, BAND launched their service with 10 titles for their game store. Similar to Kakao, while distributed on BAND’s service, the games themselves could also be downloaded through Google Play’s Store or Naver’s N Store.

Band-Games-Icon

One month later, BAND switched to an open platform format, meaning that any game could be offered through the platform, no longer limiting it to just BAND titles. It was shortly after this that the company announced that they would be acquiring more than 250 different developers to make games for BAND with the goal of releasing a new game every three days, giving BAND an average of around 40 games per month.

BAND was also attempting to gain the goodwill of their developers as well. Keys for application programing were sent to 170 different gaming companies in order for developers to quickly and efficiently upload their games to BAND. Along with a starting development kit, making games for BAND also appeared more profitable than other resources since developers could avoid paying the 30 % tax fee that other services offered and could end up keeping 52% of the profits made from each game, slightly more than some competing services.

The Problem with BAND and Games

The problem with BAND isn’t with the service or attempt to gain developers, its the games and target audience. While Kakao Games originally attempted to appeal to women in their 30’s and 40’s, and then expanded to the casual audience, BAND’s target audience is with men in their 30’s and 40’s. While this by itself is fine, its also a limited audience, arguably smaller than any other target group in the Korean mobile gaming market.

The casual audience is massive. The hardcore audience continues to slowly grow. The middle age market men hasn’t exactly moved massive amounts of mobile games nor has it made the meaningful impact outside a few select genres that BAND seems to hope for. A quick look at the top grossing games in Korea has the highest ranking BAND game, Legion of Heroes an MMORPG,  at number 134, the next two are both 148 and 191 respectively. While its not impossible that men in their 30’s and 40’s may want to play an MMORPG on their mobile devices, its not all that likely either. The genre’s target audience: the hardcore gamer would be the most interested, and with several other alternatives on much more popular services, it seems unlikely they have any incentive to switch to BAND anytime soon.

 BAND-Rankings

Missing the Target

 

It’s possible that BAND hopes to start at the middle age men market, and then branch out to a more casual market, similar to what Kakao did, however this provides another problem of being too little, too late. A majority of BAND’s available titles, despite having different titles, look oddly familiar. Puzzle games, endless runners, and other titles similar to their rival service fill the market place. While this is not an entirely bad move, making what you know will sell, in this case it does more harm than good. Nothing about these titles offers any new gimmick or interesting enough twist to the formula in order to entice anyone to play these titles. Instead it comes off as more “me too” games that already exist on more well established services which again, gives very little reason to leave.

The casual market is over-saturated to the point that it’s no longer feasible to make a clone of a successful game and expect success overnight. Knowing who your audience is, knowing what they like and knowing the games they want to play now (and beyond) is the key to success in this quick moving and unforgiving market. Having 250 developers to make games for you is pointless if you’re not exactly confident who to target those games towards.

There’s potential with BAND. The service is steadily gaining more follows daily and there have been signs of success with the overseas markets gaining interest. However, as far as game distribution goes, BAND seems to be thinking more in the now than the later, Mobile game users are more savvy than ever when it comes to downloading games and in order to keep up with the demand, distributors and publishers need to be even smarter.

 

 

profile picKyle Hovanec is a writer currently living and working in South Korea. He writes for several Korean publications including Latis Global Communications. You can contact him at khovanec87@gmail.com 

Game Community Management: How Latis and Fincon Revamped Hello Hero

community-management-mobile

What’s the secret to increasing user retention by nearly 60%? If you’re Fincon, creators of the Korean hit Hello Hero, the answer is: a little Latis muscle.

Over the last two months Latis and Fincon have worked together to revitalize the company’s Western user base. Together, we turned stagnating channels into vibrant places for users to gather, chat, and expand the Fincon brand.

The results speak for themselves:

  • 215% increase in forum users
  • ~960 topics, 8,560 posts
  • 58.97% increase in 20-day retention

 

Here are the tips we used to help Hello Hero’s Western community thrive.

Performing Community First-Aid

Fincon-Community-Management

 

Analyze

You can’t fix your community problems if you don’t first analyze them. Before throwing content at your wall to see what sticks, take stock of the current situation. Where are the majority of your community members hanging out? What problems are you facing in reaching them? They might not like the community content you are trying, or you may not be hitting the right channels. Identify these problems before you try fixing anything.

Fix

Now that you’ve identified what problems you have, you can start drafting solutions. Ask yourself:  what roadblocks can be removed? How can we add more channels? If you have an active Facebook, but a weak Twitter, consider bolstering your daily tweets. If you already have an official forum, look for other online communities, such as Toucharcade, where you can build a presence.

Grow

Once you’ve figured out what channels you’ll be focusing on, start growing your community. Engage with them daily, and remember that creating fans is more important than creating users.

Manage Your Channels

community-management-twitter

 

Official forums offer a chance to give your game, and your company brand, a personality. Your community manager should be a leader. In Fincon’s case, this was Fincon_Milo. This leader will not only give a voice and personality to the company, but they will reach out to hire and manage moderators, and push content consistently.

*Tip: pay your moderators with in-game currency and have them help you create and manage your forums.*

Facebook, Twitter, and Google+ are great places to encourage engagement with contests, memes, and other jokes. Remember to target your posts by language, and to actively respond to comments. You should be part of silly, trivial conversation, not just a microphone for content.

Let your fans contribute

Making your fans feel appreciated is the true cornerstone of community management. Bring them into the game by giving them a sense of ownership. For Hello Hero, this meant addressing the community as “Guardians” rather than users.

Sharing your resources and artwork to allow your community to be creative is another great way to foster loyalty and fun with your user base.

Whatever channels you decide to use, always remember: love your fans, and they will love you!

Your Turn

Have you had any experience with community management? What strategies did you use to make it work? Leave a comment and let us know! As always, remember to follow us on Twitter and Facebook!